Glycemic Load

 

Many people are worried when they find one of their favorite foods has a high glycemic index value. But if the glycemic load is low then you may not need to stop eating that food. Let me explain in more detail.

 

Glycemic load and glycemic index are two different things and may be bit confusing for many. When you are on a mission to flatten your stomach by limiting calorie intake you will always think about carbohydrate. Not all foods contain same amount of carbohydrate and not all carbohydrates are same. Here comes role of glycemic load and glycemic index.

 

Glycemic index (GI)

Glycemic index tells us how fast the carbohydrate is in a certain food. So if a certain food with high glycemic index contains very smaller amount of carbohydrate, then it will affect you less.

For example glucose increases your blood sugar level almost instantly but bread takes little time. Bread has low glycemic index (GI) compared to glucose. So you should try to avoid high GI foods. Even cooking may increase glycemic index of certain foods. To know more about glycemic index  and glycemic index chart of different foods please read the article titled Glycemic Index Guide.

 

Glycemic load (GL)

Glycemic Load is the index which will give you idea whether a food contains less carbohydrate per serving or more.
 

So now you will try to avoid high GI foods. But there is another thing to consider. A certain food may have high GI, but it may contain very little sugar. Is this food dangerous? Absolutely not. For example water melon has high GI but it’s mostly water. So there is nothing to be worried here. In simple words watermelon is safe because of its low glycemic load (GL).

Remember, glycemic load doesn’t ignore glycemic index. It takes account of glycemic index and portion size both.

 

Formula for glycemic load:

GL = GI x Carbohydrate content in gram/100

 

To use the formula you need to know three things:

  • GI which you will get in GI chart,
  • How much of a specific food you are going to eat (portion size) and
  • How much carbohydrate it contains.

 

An example- A fresh medium sized apple contains around 21 grams of carbohydrate, and its Glycemic index is 52, so its Glycemic load would be 52×21/100= 10.92.

 

Low, medium and high glycemic load foods:
Glycemic load is considered as high if it is more than 20, and low if it less than 10.

According to University of Sydney

  • 0-10 is considered low,
  • 11-19 considered medium and
  • 20 and above is considered high GL food.

 

So keeping flattening stomach in mind when next time you will eat breakfast, lunch, dinner or whatever you will obviously consider not only GI but also GL. Because it will help you to burn fat and lose weight, and eventually losing weight means flattened stomach. It’s impossible to get flattened stomach without burning fat.


Here is a chart of table of Glycemic Load for those who are interested to know Glycemic load of certain foods.

Food

Glycemic Index

Serving Size (gm)

Carbs per serving (gm) Carbs

Glycemic Load

Cornflakes

81

30

26

21.06

Ice-cream

61

50

13

7.93

Macaroni cheese

64

180

51

32.64

Milk, chocolate

43

50

28

12.04

Peanuts

15

50

6

0.84

Pizza, cheese

60

     

Popcorn

72

20

11

7.92

Potato, boiled

56

150

27

15.66

Potato, mashed

69

150

20

14.8

Potato, new

57

150

21

11.97

Potato, steamed

65

150

27

17.55

Pound cake

54

28

53

15.12

Potato, sweet

61

150

28

17.08

Rice, Jasmine

109

150

42

45.78

Rice, boiled, white

64

150

36

23.04

Rice, instant, boiled

46

150

42

19.32

Rice, instant, cooked (6 min)

87

150

42

36.54

Rice, long grain

56

150

41

22.96

Spaghetti, white

41

     

Waffles

76

35

13

9.88

Whole meal bread

71

30

13

9.23

Milk, whole

27

250

   

 

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